Rhian Stone
Rhian Stone

Wire drawings; wall hung works

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Lynn Muir
Lynn Muir

Driftwood figure

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Christy Keeny
Christy Keeny

Hand built ceramic sculpture

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Chiu-I Wu
Chiu-I Wu

Stoneware sculpture

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Rachel Ducker
Rachel Ducker

Twisted wire figure

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Sally MacDonell
Sally MacDonell

Porcelain figures

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Guy Routledge
Guy Routledge

Hand built ceramic face plate

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Christine Hester Smith
Christine Hester Smith

Decorated thrown slipware and extruded dishes and vases

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Sue Hanna
Sue Hanna

Stoneware figures

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Figure That

1st August - 31st October 2015

 

An exciting exhibition studying the human form.  A diverse group of makers who explore various materials and techniques in their collections come together in this showcase of contemporary craft. 
 
Expect to see spectacular sculpture, wonderful wall hung works and fabulous functional pieces. 
 
Featuring work by Rachel Ducker, Sue Hanna, Christine Hester-Smith, Christy Keeney, Sally MacDonell, Lynn Muir, Guy Routledge, Rhian Stone and Chiu-i Wu.

 

With an incredibly visual, active mind Rachel Ducker has an insatiable desire to create and make.  Well practiced in life drawing and with an appreciation of the human form and the emotional dynamics of human nature, combined with being originally trained as a jeweller, lead her to experiment with wire as a medium for sculpting the human form, capturing something ephemeral, either emotive or active.  Her pieces are untitled due to her belief that everyone sees something different in the sculptures and her lack of suggestion leads them to live that moment she portrays in their own particular way.  Rachel uses no model and she doesn’t form the shape around anything.  The posture is first designed and then the pieces are carefully moulded by hand and then gradually added to, wrapping wire, layer by layer.

 

Sue Hanna trained as a sculptor at St Martin’s College of Arts in London, originally working with wood and metal.  Her journey with fired clay started in the late 1990s; a chance encounter with a South African potter proved instrumental in developing her interest in ceramics.  Sue's work is a meditation on humanity; life drawing encourages close observation of the human form.  She finds inspiration in tribal art, through which she has developed an appreciation of the power of simplicity.  The masks and figures of different cultures have informed and broadened her interest in and understanding of both beauty and craftsmanship; contrast and opposites, darkness and light, wakefulness & sleep, and of the cycle of life itself

 

Christine Hester Smith's pots are a combination of illustration, form and function.  "I endeavour to combine my enjoyment of drawing and love of the illustrative line and humour with the spontaneous medium of fluid slip and clay.”  Christine’s pots are made from red earthenware clay where she makes use of thrown forms, slabs and extrusions.  It is these techniques used in her making which have served as a wonderful inspiring canvas for her illustrative decoration moving away from the constraints of obvious functionality.

 

Christy Keeney studied ceramics at the Royal College of Art in London.   He was commissioned by the sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi to work on a portrait of Richard Rodgers, for an exhibition at the National portrait gallery in London 1988.  His figurative ceramics are an investigation into the human condition and his forms are stretched to the point where sculpture and drawing overlap.  His sculpted slab built heads and figures demonstrate the wonderful sense of draughtsmanship as details are drawn into the wet clay surface.

 

Sally MacDonell models the female form; creating figures from tubes and slabs of clay, squeezed and pinched together.  Each has its own personality and is unique.  The figures are finished with copper oxide, underglaze stains and coloured engobes, firing up to 1186° for the final glaze firing.  Sally’s interest lies in primitive Arts and antiquities.  She travels to sell at Ceramic and Art fairs throughout the UK and Europe, enjoying meeting collectors and other potters.

 

Lynn Muir trained as an illustrator at Colchester School of Art.  The first part of her career was spent in East Anglia as a designer of theatre and retail props.  This was where she first started to use wood.  In 1986-7 she began working with wood again, establishing her workshop which overlooks the Atlantic, an ideal location for collecting the driftwood with which she makes the painted driftwood figures.  She uses saws and sanders to carve the figures. Each piece evolves in the making, sometimes ideas are found in the wood itself.  She received the "Toymaker of the Year" award in 1994.

 

Guy Routledge has worked in ceramics for the last 20 years after studying glass and ceramics at Sunderland University.  Guy’s first studio was in Auckland, New Zealand and he returned to England in 1993.  Guy’s work consists of brightly coloured vessels, bottles and a wide range of sculptural figurative ceramics, based loosely around the head and face.  These faces are the pieces he’ll be displaying for our show ‘Figure That’ which are largely monochrome.  All of the work is hand built which gives a unique character and presence to the pieces. 

 

Through large and small scale mixed media installations, using soft iron wire and other materials Rhian Stone wishes to re-engage the viewer with a familiar in order to create a new aesthetic.  She wants the viewer to immerse themselves in the work itself, creating an immediate and lasting reaction.  Her continuous wire figures for the wall are beautifully constructed and intriguing. “It is the notion of becoming distinct within a world of uniformity.  It is an exploration of the contrast between a social and individual ideal, where imperfections are not seen as flaws, rather as characteristics; these unwanted and unplanned details become the ideal, more perfect than the initial design to start.”  

 

When Chiu-I Wu was little it was with pen and paper that she felt expressive; drawing and drawing without thought.  The feeling never left her and she graduated to paint, then finally to ceramics.  She developed her art and ceramics in her home country, Taiwan and exhibited her first work in Taipei.  Her work is hand built with great care.  “My memories of childhood are built up in many pieces, I couldn't remember them all, but enough to fill a day dream.  I always thought I was a very shy and quiet person at school, but remembering the playing life, it was all wild and crazy. The best time of my childhood, was living in my mum's friend's house who had 3 young children living in a very traditional Chinese house with rolling hills as our playground.”

Rachel Ducker's work on display

Rachel Ducker's work on display

Rachel Ducker's work on display

Rachel Ducker's work on display

Rachel Ducker's work on display

Rachel Ducker's work on display

Rachel Ducker

Rachel Ducker

Chiu-i Wu and Sue Hanna

Chiu-i Wu and Sue Hanna

Figure That overview

Figure That overview

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Guy Routledge's work on display

Guy Routledge's work on display

Christy Keeney's work on display

Christy Keeney's work on display

Guy Routledge's work on display

Guy Routledge's work on display

Sue Hanna's work on display

Sue Hanna's work on display

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