Tableware and serving items

 

Josie Walter

Josie makes tableware and cooking pots in earthenware clay which are decorated with slips and coloured glazes.  All the pots she makes are functional and are made to be used in the kitchen or for serving on the table.  The decorative motifs are used to complement the food cooked and served in them and provide a pot that is pleasing to the eye when not in use.  Most of the work is thrown on a momentum wheel, which Josie made at Chesterfield College, in the 1970s.  Josie enjoys the relaxed rhythm and the quietness of the flywheel as it is the only way to hear Radio 4 without interference.  Over the past years Josie has experimented with combinations of paper resist, colour infill and slip trailing.  Using the marks of a brush highlighted with scraffito has created a greater sense of movement and a fresh perspective and Josie is always on the lookout for new brushes or a way of applying slip; her two favourites at the moment are a coarse pastry brush and another made with dried grass collected from the beach on Anglesey, North Wales.  Josie also decorates with coloured glazes, again both thinly but with detail in thick, rather like applying watercolour, moving from light to dark.  Recent work has been based on leaf motifs, very appropriate to the Derbyshire countryside where she lives but she also continually returns to images of fruits, intrigued by the way fat pears ‘sit’ or oval lemons ‘lie’.

 

Ken Eardley

Ken Eardley is a ceramic artist based in Brighton. Coming from a textile background he has since explored ceramics as a decorative medium for his ideas.  His style and use of fun colour and graphic is now widely recognised and has been featured in numerous magazines.  All his pieces are made individually by ken and glazed using colourful earthenware glazes.

 

Laura Lane

Laura’s work is inspired by tall tales & folklore from Cornwall.  Made from a Cornish stoneware clay, these functional hand thrown ceramics are made with love.  The work is hand thrown, brushed with the dark slip & then decorated using a sgraffito technique, before being dipped in a white tin glaze.  These layers and brush marks that you can see represent the idea of storytelling being passed down through the generations, much akin to Chinese Whispers, some parts are brushed over and lost whilst other marks are clearly there for us all to see.  The slate/blue colour is a reminder of the moors, skies and sea.  All of these separate elements are pulled together with a pinch of fun using functional vessels as a canvas. 

 

Emma Lacey

Every object Emma creates is driven by a love of subtle and sensual forms and a passion for design and making.  She enjoys the tactility of clay both during the making process and after firing, hoping this comes across in her work.  People are often drawn in by the shape and colour of Emma’s pieces then continue to explore and discover them the longer they hold them for.  The contrast between a matt and glossy glaze might encourage you to explore the surface, or the form might make you hold a cup in a particular way.  Similarly, the dent in the Everyday range allows the person holding it to get a sense of the softness of the clay just after the shape is thrown on the wheel.  Emma loves the thought that the material properties of an object can connect the designer or maker’s experience to that of the person using it.

 

William Firth

William has always been creative, whether it be making music or building all of his own bedroom furniture when he was a teenager.  He has always been hand crafting something or other, inspired by seeing his Grandad turning bowls on his lathe when he was a child.  One of the most important things to him about starting William Firth Woodcraft was to ensure that he used the highest quality materials, processes and finishes to ensure his products last at least one lifetime.  William is truly passionate about every item his creates and feels lucky he can now call woodcraft his career.  Every single one of his products is 100% handmade from start to finish and is therefore unique.  Each product has its own story and starts its own journey when it leaves his workshop.

 

Luke Bishop

Luke makes contemporary porcelain vessels using a variety of traditional methods, including the potter’s wheel.  His work often plays with and questions our typically held assumptions of what makes an object functional.  Luke’s primary interest is a continuing exploration of the (sometimes fractious) marriage between Abstraction and Function.  His work is a study in contrasts combining sharp, refined silhouettes with uneven, organic edges and rough white porcelain surfaces against rich, smooth glazes.   Luke’s ceramic practice is informed by a background in graphic design, Information Architecture, interface design and an innate interest in functionality and human behaviour.  An urban ceramicist living and working in Central London, Luke’s influences are wide ranging; the quirky utilitarian and sculptural pots of Ben Fiess, the quiet canvasses or Giorgio Morandi, the mysterious graphic design of 23 Envelope and the honest ringware ceramics by Bauer from the early 20th century.  Luke studied ceramics at the CityLit in Central London and earned his Master of Arts Degree from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA.

 

Victoria Claire Dawes

‘For Dennis ’is a reflection upon the time Victoria spent working for Dennis Black, a former Sheffield steel worker, as his cleaner in the late stages of his life.  A red brick house with strong blue trim decorated with anaglypta wallpaper, faded floral carpets, net curtains and carefully displayed trinkets, walking into Dennis’s house was like taking a step into the past.  He told great stories of his family and a life working in the steel industry.  While Victoria knew Dennis he lived to honour the promise he made to his wife’s father when she moved to Sheffield from Wales to always look after her.

Consisting of a bread bin, butter dish, butter and bread knives and 9 inch plate the collection is a celebration of a self-contained family life.  A life spent providing for and taking care of each other through industrial and domestic work with the kitchen table at the heart of the home.  The pieces are designed for everyday use;rRelatively simple in form, they draw inspiration from pieces of industrial structure and the décor of the home that Dennis and his wife created together.  The surfaces of the pieces celebrate a harmony between two very contrasting veins of hard work undertaken in the steel industry and the home to take care of each other and bring up a family.  Victoria uses use red earthenware in the creation of her works; the most abundant clay on the Earth’s surface.  Through its formation process the clay travels through glaciers, rivers and streams breaking down and picking up oxides and detritus that provide its rich colour and low firing properties.  Having emigrated between England and New Zealand at an early age, choosing to travel and study in the Upper Midwest of America,  Victoria feels connected to earthenware as a material affected and formed by the places it has passed through.  Using the potter’s wheel and slow repetitive mark-making processes, Victoria’s practice is a meditation on the past as she makes tableware inspired by memories of her home.  Drawn from a romanticised nostalgia for people, places and traditions,  she brings together snippets of banister spindles, soft drapery, embroidery and loose pyjamas to decorate pieces to be used and shared around today’s tables.  Built from memories of the past at the beginning of new traditions, my cups and plates find life on and off well-loved sideboards, growing in character as they pick up chips on their rims; the patina of a life well lived.

 

Helen Faulkner

Originally from Belfast Helen initially studied Contemporary Crafts in England before beginning the CCOI Pottery Skills course, in Thomastown, to improve the technical side of her work.  Thomastown gradually worked its charm on her and she worked with several great potters over nearly seven years.  More recently she moved back to Northern Ireland to take part in the Making It Programme.  Helen makes tableware designed for food that feels good in the hand and makes you what to eat or drink from them.  Helen wants her work to tie in with how people live yet still stand out and show that it has been made with care, consideration and skill, not popped off a production line for quick sale.   The work Helen makes is mostly for food, Helen’s other love in life.  She makes pottery to be used in the kitchen, serving family and friends and tries to make pieces that fit into how one cooks (an example being a small flat based bowl with a pouring spout which she made for her sister for her to mix her marinades for her famous curry nights). 

 

 

 

 

 

Come Dine With Me

1st July - 23rd September

 

 

Lazy brunches, relaxed Sunday afternoons or perfect picnics, dine in style with this collection of informal and contemporary tableware, serving utensils and items to set the scene including candle holders and decorative objects.

Pictured; Victoria Claire Dawes, 'For Dennis' tabelware collection.

Setting the scene

 

Sinead O’Moore

Sinead use either porcelain or white earthenware to form small bowls evoking the fragility of eggshells.  These tealight holders are a pretty conversation piece for any dining experience.  The white earthenware is a solid material so she uses mixes of crystalline glazes to the interior of the shell whilst leaving the exterior raw.  The porcelain collection, in turn, is kept very simple by using the beauty of the pure porcelain, and to benefit from its strength and translucent properties.  Using a mould as her resist she makes them by hand and the clay has the imprint of her fingertips.  With the porcelain there is also a natural slight variation of thickness which when lit at night produces a soft cloudy effect.  Each shell is pushed to a non-uniform shape & sanded on the outside surface to produce a smooth tactile surface.  Working the porcelain to near paper fine thinness Sinead is interested in seeing how delicate she can work the porcelain while still retaining its strength.  This has also led to combining various sizes of porcelain bowls into each other.  The porcelain becomes soft during firing & moves in reaction to the form she has made.  The finished piece will depend on how the combined bowls counter-balance & react to each other, becoming a unique organic form.

 

Simon Denvers

Simon is based in rural Derbyshire where he designs and makes his laser engraved and laser cut homewares, wall art and jewellery.  Wherever possible his products are made using sustainable materials from local dealers, including leather offcuts from local remnant shops which would otherwise be destined for landfill, and wood veneers from various sources in Derbyshire, Yorkshire and Lancashire.  Simon’s work mainly involves pattern design, which he applies to interesting and sometimes unusual materials.  He prefers to work primarily in soft and hardwoods but has used all sorts of materials over the last 4 or 5 years.  Simon is mainly self-taught in a lot of what he does with his current tools of choice being Illustrator, Corel draw, Rhino3D and Grasshopper3D.  The latter two, especially, he has found to be fantastic tools for generating mathematically derived surface patterns and 3D forms.  Simon can list many influences on his design style, but it’s mainly maths, nature and music.  To him they all intertwine.  Probably the greatest influence is nature itself particularly when mathematics can be used to model natural forms and shapes.  For this show we'll be displaying a wide selection of placemats, coasters and wall mounted planters.

 

Timea Sido

Timea Sido is an award winning designer who has been handcrafting intricate ceramic objects since 2002.  Born in the UK, but with roots in Hungary, Timea’s passion for design started at an early age with Saturday pottery classes. Timea graduated from Central St Martins College of Art and Design in 2001, but at this point was working in fashion and textile design. It wasn’t until she joined the prestigious Cockpit Arts’ studios in 2002 that she started to translate her designs into clay.  This explains why her ceramics have a wonderfully fluid, draped quality to them, often defying the conventions of traditional ceramics.  The distinctive ‘tangled’ pattern that has become Timea’s signature style was born of a moment in her garden when she witnessed a leaf flying into a spider’s web, shattering the symmetry into a mess of tangled lines. In order to capture this moment in time, Timea developed an innovative technique in which lines of delicate white earthenware clay are layered to construct a three-dimensional filigree surface.  Timea is driven by a desire to create simple yet elegant contemporary decorative objects that enhance the home and for this particualr show expect to see a wide selection of her tea light candle holders, candles, candlesticks, vessels, vases and decorative vessels.

 

Rebecca Lawley

Designer silversmith Rebecca Lawley studied silversmithing at Sheffield Hallam University graduating with a BA (hons) in 3D Metalwork and Jewellery in 1996.  Rebecca produces silver tableware, which is both functional and beautiful to look at; each piece is unique and has a distinctive character.  Expect to see olive pots and picks, candle holders and decorative etched bowls for this show  Rebecca finds working with silver rewarding, enjoying the technical and physical aspects of forming, forging and raising, seeing the sheet transform into a sculptural and unique object.  Her main inspiration for the work has evolved to incorporate elements of mid-century design; the simple, clear, crisp forms, beautifully finished are the aesthetics that she continues to aspire to.  This selection of new work shows Rebecca experimenting in applying texture and pattern to her work. These latest pieces have been etched using beeswax as a resist and the designs are drawn straight onto the piece before being etched in an acid solution.  Rebecca cites her design influences as mid twentieth century design, especially Lucienne Day, and Scandinavian design.  The integrity of Rebecca’s sophisticated designs give her work both a modern and a timeless appeal that resonates with all ages.  Rebecca’s recipe of intuition and imagination, discipline and technical skill creates quality investment pieces that are also beautiful additions to any home.

 

Sue Candy

For the past 12 years Sue has been working full-time as a ceramicist, selling directly to the public and to galleries throughout the British Isles.  Sue has been visiting North Norfolk from her home town of Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire for many years, drawing inspiration from the big skies, the sea, the beach huts, the flint cottages, the light and the landscape.  In fact, earlier this year she made the move there.  Sue is excited to be taking part in the Come Dine with Me exhibition as she wants to maintain strong links with the artist community in Yorkshire and the many friends she has made there, but is also looking forward to getting involved with the art and craft scene in North Norfolk and finding new inspirations for future work.  Sue makes contemporary tableware from porcelain slabs decorated with a subtle palette.  Each piece is individually made by hand using clay slabs, and decorated using a variety of techniques including inlay, sgraffito, impressing, incising, printing and metal lustre painting.  Her reputation is built on the clean geometric shapes and the delicacy of her designs, the inspiration for which is drawn mainly from the sea, coastal themes and her garden.  Sue calls her pieces mustard pots, salt and pepper pots, chutney pots, tea light holders etc. but the uses to which they can be put are limited only by the imagination.

 

Jane Maddison

After graduating from Croyden College of Art in 1969, Jane Maddison ran a small business in London producing handmade tiles and silk screen blinds.  She later moved to Lincolnshire where she set up her Ceramics Studio producing both sculptural and domestic ware using a variety of techniques and various methods of firing including raku and salt glaze.  Jane’s wonderful little animals result from her mother’s impractical method of trying to let a bottle of red wine breathe whilst keeping the fruit flies away, which she did by balancing the cork over the open top!  Jane thought that a purpose-built sculptural top was a better solution and so the wine breather was born.  There are now over 20 designs in the range.  Jane’s wonderful little creatures allow your wine to breathe, but they keep the annoying little fruit flies out of the bottle.  At the same time, you can enjoy the little beast adorning your bottle.  All of them are decorated by illustrator Kevin Maddison and with his quirky line and brush work, each animal becomes an individual piece of art. 

 

May Bank Holiday

Opening Hours

 

Open Sat 27th May 10am - 5pm

Closed Sun 28th, Mon 29th and Tues 30th May to re-open Wed 31st May normal opening hours

Laura Lane stoneware

Laura Lane stoneware

Luke Bishop porcelain

Luke Bishop porcelain

Jane Maddison ceramic wine breathers

Jane Maddison ceramic wine breathers

Simon Denvers and Josie Walter

Simon Denvers and Josie Walter

Victoria C Dawes & William Firth

Victoria C Dawes & William Firth

Emma Lacey fine stoneware

Emma Lacey fine stoneware

Ken Eardley glazed earthenware

Ken Eardley glazed earthenware

Timea Sido earthenware

Timea Sido earthenware

Sinead O'Moore

Sinead O'Moore

Victoria C Dawes & William Firth

Victoria C Dawes & William Firth

Josie Walter

Josie Walter

Timea Sido

Timea Sido

Emma Lacey

Emma Lacey

Sinead O'Moore

Sinead O'Moore

Helen Faulkner terracotta collection

Helen Faulkner terracotta collection

Rebecca Lawley & Sue Candy

Rebecca Lawley & Sue Candy

Laura Lane

Laura Lane

Luke Bishop

Luke Bishop

Jane Maddison

Jane Maddison

Ken Eardley

Ken Eardley

Overview

Overview

Victoria Claire Dawes

Victoria Claire Dawes

Helen Faulkner

Helen Faulkner

Luke Bishop

Luke Bishop

Simon Denvers

Simon Denvers

Laura Lane

Laura Lane

Overview

Overview

Rebecca Lawley

Rebecca Lawley

Emma Lacey

Emma Lacey

Overview

Overview

Simon Denvers

Simon Denvers

Sue Candy

Sue Candy

Helen Faulkner

Helen Faulkner

Overview & Dress Code Glamour show

Overview & Dress Code Glamour show

Helen Faulkner

Helen Faulkner

Victoria Claire Dawes

Victoria Claire Dawes

Simon Denvers

Simon Denvers

Missed Jo's Meet the Maker event here earlier this May?  Scroll down the page to view some pics of the afternoon.

Missed Victoria Claire Dawe's Meet the Maker event here on the 15th July?  Scroll down the page to view some pics  and videos of the afternoon.

Missed our Meet the Maker event with Victoria Claire Dawes?  Check out our videos and photographs from the event below.

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