Liz Somerville - Solo Print Exhibition

3rd March - 23rd June 2018

Liz creates linocut prints with imagery concentrating on landscapes and the incidental forms and structures found within them.  Walking forms a major part of Liz’s work and life.  She does most of it in winter, a perfect time to see a landscape; its bare bones, hard contours, un-obscured structures and un-adorned trees.  Once back in the studio she draws what she’s seen, using sketches, photos and memory and then translates her drawings into lino.

Liz in her studio...
Liz in her studio...
Dark Woods
Dark Woods
What Lies Beneath
What Lies Beneath
Through an Enchanted Forest
Through an Enchanted Forest
Son of Chapman
Son of Chapman
Sea Encircled
Sea Encircled
River Running Through
River Running Through
Path
Path
Path to Hambledon
Path to Hambledon
Park Life
Park Life
Embrace
Embrace
From the Beacon to the Mouth
From the Beacon to the Mouth
Enchanted Wood
Enchanted Wood
Giant
Giant
Old Harry and his Mother
Old Harry and his Mother
Islands
Islands
On Sculpted Hill
On Sculpted Hill
Paris
Paris
A Windy Day at the Pier
A Windy Day at the Pier
Abbotts Bowl
Abbotts Bowl

After a foundation course at Canterbury College, a false start on a combined english and textile design degree course at Bretton Hall, Liz left Winchester School of Art in 1988 with a BA Hons in textile design.  She spent 11 years in London having a variety of jobs including printed fabric design, management of the Contemporary Textile Gallery, and marketing and graphics for a structural engineering consultancy.  This was alongside development her art practice in her shared studio on Hoxton Square. 
 
Printmaking has always been a love of hers.  Having experimented with lots of different techniques, relief printing, linocuts and woodcuts combined with painted blocks of colour, is, for her, the most satisfactory method.  Landscape is a central theme and the winter the best time to see it; plough and livestock tracks, oddly shaped fields, quirky colour: flow, lyricism and mark-making.
 
For this exhibition, she will, at last, have a fully functioning relief press and much of the work will have been made using it.  "These techniques are very much a means to an end; the overall effect is what I’m after, I’m no slave to convention."